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21 Job Interview Tips: How to Make a Great Impression

Tips for before the interview

In the days before your job interview, set aside time to do the following:

1. Start by researching the company and your interviewers. Understanding key information about the company you’re interviewing with can help you go into your interview with confidence. Using the company’s website, social media posts and recent press releases will provide a solid understanding of the company’s goals and how your background makes you a great fit.

2. Practice your answers to common interview questions. Prepare your answer to the common question: “Tell me about yourself, and why are you interested in this role with our company?” The idea is to quickly communicate who you are and what value you will bring to the company and the role—it’s your personal elevator pitch.

3. Reread the job description. You may want to print it out and begin underlining specific skills the employer is looking for. Think about examples from your past and current work that align with these requirements.

4. Use the STAR method in answering questions. Prepare to be asked about times in the past when you used a specific skill and use the STAR method to tell stories with a clear Situation, Task, Action and Result.

5. Recruit a friend to practice answering questions. Actually practicing your answers out loud is an incredibly effective way to prepare. Say them to yourself or ask a friend to help run through questions and answers. You’ll find you gain confidence as you get used to saying the words.

6. Prepare a list of references. Your interviewers might require you to submit a list of references before or after your interview. Having a reference list prepared ahead of time can help you quickly complete this step to move forward in the hiring process.

7. Be prepared with examples of your work. During the interview, you will likely be asked about specific work you’ve completed in relation to the position. After reviewing the job description, think of work you’ve done in past jobs, clubs or volunteer positions that show you have experience and success doing the work they require.

8. Prepare smart questions for your interviewers. Interviews are a two-way street. Employers expect you to ask questions: they want to know that you’re thinking seriously about what it would be like to work there. Here are some questions you may want to consider asking your interviewers:

  • Can you explain some of the day-to-day responsibilities this job entails?
  • How would you describe the characteristics of someone who would succeed in this role?
  • If I were in this position, how would my performance be measured? How often?
  • What departments does this teamwork with regularly?
  • How do these departments typically collaborate?
  • What does that process look like?
  • What are the challenges you’re currently facing in your role?

Tips for during the interview

After you’ve spent time preparing, you can be successful on interview day by practicing these tips:

9. Plan your interview attire the night before. If you’re speaking to a recruiter before the interview, you can ask them about the dress code in the workplace and choose your outfit accordingly. If you don’t have someone to ask, research the company to learn what’s appropriate. For more, visit How to Dress for a Job Interview.

10. Bring copies of your resume, a notebook and pen. Take at least five copies of your printed resume on clean paper in case of multiple interviewers. Highlight specific accomplishments on your copy that you can easily refer to and discuss. Bring a pen and a small notebook. Prepare to take notes, but not on your smartphone or another electronic device. Write information down so that you can refer to these details in your follow-up thank-you notes. Maintain eye contact as much as possible. For more, visit What to Bring to the Interview.

11. Plan your schedule so that you can arrive 10–15 minutes early. Map out your route to the interview location so you can be sure to arrive on time. Consider doing a practice run. If you’re taking public transportation, identify a backup plan if there are delays or closures.

Tip: When you arrive early, use the extra minutes to observe workplace dynamics.

12. Make a great first impression. Don’t forget the little things—shine your shoes, make sure your nails are clean and tidy, and check your clothes for holes, stains, pet hair and loose threads. Display confident body language and a smile throughout.

13. Treat everyone you encounter with respect. This includes people on the road and in the parking lot, security personnel and front desk staff. Treat everyone you don’t know as though they’re the hiring manager. Even if they aren’t, your potential employer might ask for their feedback.

14. Practice good manners and body language. Practice confident, accessible body language from the moment you enter the building. Sit or stand tall with your shoulders back. Before the interview, take a deep breath and exhale slowly to manage feelings of anxiety and encourage self-confidence. The interviewer should extend their hand first to initiate a handshake. Stand, look the person in the eye and smile. A good handshake should be firm but not crush the other person’s fingers. For more, visit Everything You Need to Know About Job Interview Etiquette.

15. Win them over with your authenticity and positivity. Being genuine during interview conversations can help employers easily relate to you. Showing positivity with a smile and upbeat body language can help keep the interview light and constructive.

16. Respond truthfully to the questions asked. While it can seem tempting to embellish on your skills and accomplishments, interviewers find honesty refreshing and respectable. Focus on your key strengths and why your background makes you uniquely qualified for the position.

17. Tie your answers back to your skills and accomplishments. With any question you answer, it is important that you tie your background to the job by providing examples of solutions and results you’ve achieved. Use every opportunity to address the requirements listed in the job description.

18. Keep your answers concise and focused. Your time with each interviewer is limited so be mindful of rambling. Practicing your answers beforehand can help keep you focused.

19. Do not speak negatively about your previous employers. Companies want to hire problem solvers who overcome tough situations. If you’re feeling discouraged about your current job, focus on talking about what you’ve gained from that experience and what you want to do next.

Tips for after the interview

When the interview is over, give yourself the best chances of moving forward by doing the following:

20. Ask about next steps. After your interview, it is appropriate to ask either your interviewer, hiring manager or recruiter about what you should expect next. This will likely be a follow-up email with results from your interview, additional requirements like an assignment or reference list or another interview.

21. Send a personalized thank you letter after the interview. Ask for the business card of each person you speak with during the interview process so that you can follow up individually with a separate thank you email. If you interviewed in the morning, send your follow-up emails the same day. If you interviewed in the afternoon, the next morning is fine. Make certain that each email is distinct from the others, using the notes you took during the conversations.

 

4 A’s for Acing The Group (PANEL) Interview

 

 

 

Recruitment firms are going online to interview candidates who are working from home during the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic.

Frogg Recruitment SA is also implementing Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) “Safety Measurement precaution”, interviewing candidates VIA Telephone, Skype, ZOOM or Whatsapp Video Calls, this will make it safer for all. Safety is our first priority. 

Tech giants Google, Amazon and Twitter are among the growing number of firms asking staff to work from home.

The strategy is part of social distancing efforts as businesses try to slow the spread of the virus.

Headhunters also say it’s now easier to contact candidates as they’re not in stuck in meetings or travelling.

Worldwide travel restrictions also mean people aren’t travelling for business, one of the biggest challenges for recruiters trying to meet potential hires.It comes as recruiters and hiring managers switch from face-to-face meetings to online interviews using apps such as Skype, Zoom and WhatsApp.

Online interviews also suit potential hires as they take up less time and are more convenient.

“They are happy to use this approach as well because it saves them traveling time and minimizes human contact amidst the Covid-19 outbreak,”

But job-seeking candidates are being advised to practice ahead of an online interview. “Interviewing online and interviewing in person are two completely different experiences,”

“Job seekers share that it can be more challenging to connect with the interviewer online because there is often less small talk and it’s harder to pick up on non-verbal cues,” she added.

Recruiters also advise candidates to be patient as, although online job interviews can help speed up the process, there will still be delays as businesses come up with contingency plans and deal with corona virus-related issues. “This is uncharted territory and we are all doing the best we can,” – reliable source

But online interviews don’t work for everyone. “Those roles which require client interaction and team management, an in-person interview is likely to remain an essential stage of the process,”

Frogg Recruitment SA – Follow Suite…

Do’s & Don’t s to ACE a Job Interview – Remember if you want to ACE your Interview you need to do the following 

The job interview is an unusual situation: You’re put in a room you’ve never been in, with a person you’ve never met, to talk about a company you don’t work at, in order to persuade somebody that you’ll be excellent at a job you don’t have.

But a lot of the “mystery” around great job interviewing comes from the fact that we don’t do it that often. Every few years, we’re supposed to magically dust off our interview skills and go out there and shine. So, here’s what you need to know for making your job interviews a lot less nerve-wracking and a lot more effective.

Preparation for the interview

Preparation is the first essential step towards conducting a successful interview. The better prepared you are, the more confident you’ll be.

But a lot of the “mystery” around great job interviewing comes from the fact that we don’t do it that often.

Ensure that you know the following things:

The exact time and location of the interview, route, parking etc and how long it will take to get there. The interviewer’s correct title and pronunciation of his or her full name.

Specific facts about the company – its history, financial position, competitors, products and services. Research the company’s website in full.

Facts and figures about your present or former employer. Refresh your memory on this as you will be expected to know a lot about a company for which you have previously worked.

Prepare some questions to ask the interviewer. Remember that an interview is a two-way street. The interviewer will try to determine through questioning whether you are the right person for a specific job. Likewise, you must determine through questioning whether this potential employer will provide the opportunity for career development that you seek.

Interview techniques

During the interview, you will be assessed for your strengths and weaknesses/areas for development. In addition to this, specific personal characteristics will be examined, such as attitude, aptitude, stability, motivation and maturity.

Some interview do’s and don’ts follow:

DO arrive on time or a few minutes early.

Late arrival for a job interview is never excusable.

DO greet the interviewer by his or her title and surname. If you are not sure of the name pronunciation, ask the interviewer to repeat it.

DO shake hands firmly.

DO wait until you are offered a chair before sitting. Always sit upright in your chair and look alert and interested.

DO be as charismatic as possible; it is very important that you demonstrate your interpersonal skills during the interview.

DO be a good listener as well as a good talker.

DO smile and show confidence…

DO look the interviewer in the eye.

DO follow the interviewer’s leads. Try, however, to obtain a full description of the position and duties it incorporates at an early stage so that you can relay your appropriate background and skills accordingly.

DO make sure that your good points get across to the interviewer in a concise, factual and sincere manner. Waffle will get you nowhere. Bear in mind that only you can sell yourself and make the interviewer aware of the benefits that you can offer to the organisation.

DO always conduct yourself as if you are determined to get the job you are discussing. Never close the door on opportunity. It is better to be in a position where you can choose from several offers – rather than only one.

DON’T answer questions with a simple ‘yes’ or ‘no’. Explain yourself whenever possible. Describe those things about yourself that relate to the position on offer.

DON’T lie. Answer questions truthfully, frankly and as close to the point as possible.

DON’T make derogatory remarks about your present or former employers.

DON’T enquire about salary, holidays, bonuses etc. at the initial interview unless you are positive that the interviewer wants to hire you. You should, however, know your market value and be prepared to specify your required salary or range.

DON’T tell the Interviewer that you been to several Interviews and that you are waiting on Offers.

DON’T TALK MONEY!!! Don’t overpower the conversation

Don’t Chew Chappies or eat Sweets.

Be prepared to answer questions such as:

Why did you choose a career in XYZ – whatever Industry you in?

What kind of job are you seeking?

What is your work-related or overall experience?

Why would you like to work for our company?

What do you want to be doing in your career five years from now?

When was your last salary review?

What style of management gets the best from you?

What interests you about our product/service?

What have you learned from some of the jobs you have held?

Which job did you enjoy the most and why?

What have you done that shows initiative in your career?

What are your major weaknesses and what are your strengths?

What do you think determines a person’s progress in a good company?

Are you willing to relocate?

What are your hobbies?

What does ‘teamwork’ mean to you?

Closing the interview

If you are interested in the position enquire about the next interview stage. If the interview offers the position to you and you want it, accept on the spot. If you wish for some time to think it over, be courteous and tactful in asking for that time. Set a definite date on which you can provide an answer.

Don’t be too discouraged if no definite offer is made nor a specific salary discussed. The interviewer will probably want to consult colleagues or interview other candidates (or both) before making a decision.

If you get the impression that the interview is not going very well and you have already been rejected, don’t let your discouragement show. Occasionally an interviewer who is genuinely interested in your possibilities may intend to discourage you in order to test your reaction.

Thank the interviewer for the time spent with you. Make sure to Greet everyone you walk pass.

After the interview

Lastly, and most importantly, call your consultant immediately after the interview to explain what happened. The consultant will want to speak with you before the interviewer calls. The Recruitment Consultant you are dealing with will give you further feedback and communicate between you and the possible new employer. NEVER Contact the Employer yourself as it will boil down to being too aggressive and not needed. Even if the Interviewer in the said phone us in two days, contact the Recruitment Consultant as they will find out what the Clients is referring too.

Good Luck and Remember your DO’s and Don’t